Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Nutrition

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Medieval cuisine
Grain, either as bread crumbs or flour, was also the most common thickener of soups and stews, alone or in combination with almond milk. Thom Tillis "shocked" letter alleging Kavanaugh misconduct didn't come up during testimony Play Video. Introduction to Sport Psychology. Practical application of techniques for shaping healthier emotional behavior; emphasis on personality, stress management, and fulfilling relationships. Cost of losing 20 pounds:

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Butter , another important dairy product, was in popular use in the regions of Northern Europe that specialized in cattle production in the latter half of the Middle Ages, the Low Countries and Southern Scandinavia. While most other regions used oil or lard as cooking fats, butter was the dominant cooking medium in these areas. Its production also allowed for a lucrative butter export from the 12th century onward.

While all forms of wild game were popular among those who could obtain it, most meat came from domestic animals. Domestic working animals that were no longer able to work were slaughtered but not particularly appetizing and therefore were less valued as meat. Beef was not as common as today because raising cattle was labor-intensive, requiring pastures and feed, and oxen and cows were much more valuable as draught animals and for producing milk.

Mutton and lamb were fairly common, especially in areas with a sizeable wool industry, as was veal. Domestic pigs often ran freely even in towns and could be fed on just about any organic waste, and suckling pig was a sought-after delicacy. Just about every part of the pig was eaten, including ears, snout, tail, tongue , and womb.

Intestines, bladder and stomach could be used as casings for sausage or even illusion food such as giant eggs. Among the meats that today are rare or even considered inappropriate for human consumption are the hedgehog and porcupine , occasionally mentioned in late medieval recipe collections.

In England, they were deliberately introduced by the 13th century and their colonies were carefully protected. They were of particular value for monasteries, because newborn rabbits were allegedly declared fish or, at least, not-meat by the church and therefore they could be eaten during Lent. A wide range of birds were eaten, including swans , peafowl , quail , partridge , storks , cranes , larks , linnets and other songbirds that could be trapped in nets, and just about any other wild bird that could be hunted.

Swans and peafowl were domesticated to some extent, but were only eaten by the social elite, and more praised for their fine appearance as stunning entertainment dishes, entremets , than for their meat. As today, geese and ducks had been domesticated but were not as popular as the chicken , the fowl equivalent of the pig. But at the Fourth Council of the Lateran , Pope Innocent III explicitly prohibited the eating of barnacle geese during Lent, arguing that they lived and fed like ducks and so were of the same nature as other birds.

Meats were more expensive than plant foods. Though rich in protein , the calorie -to-weight ratio of meat was less than that of plant food. Meat could be up to four times as expensive as bread. Fish was up to 16 times as costly, and was expensive even for coastal populations. This meant that fasts could mean an especially meager diet for those who could not afford alternatives to meat and animal products like milk and eggs. It was only after the Black Death had eradicated up to half of the European population that meat became more common even for poorer people.

The drastic reduction in many populated areas resulted in a labor shortage, meaning that wages dramatically increased. It also left vast areas of farmland untended, making them available for pasture and putting more meat on the market. Although less prestigious than other animal meats, and often seen as merely an alternative to meat on fast days, seafood was the mainstay of many coastal populations. Also included were the beaver , due to its scaly tail and considerable time spent in water, and barnacle geese , due to the belief that they developed underwater in the form of barnacles.

The Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II examined barnacles and noted no evidence of any bird-like embryo in them, and the secretary of Leo of Rozmital wrote a very skeptical account of his reaction to being served barnacle goose at a fish-day dinner in Especially important was the fishing and trade in herring and cod in the Atlantic and the Baltic Sea. The herring was of unprecedented significance to the economy of much of Northern Europe, and it was one of the most common commodities traded by the Hanseatic League , a powerful north German alliance of trading guilds.

Kippers made from herring caught in the North Sea could be found in markets as far away as Constantinople. Stockfish , cod that was split down the middle, fixed to a pole and dried, was very common, though preparation could be time-consuming, and meant beating the dried fish with a mallet before soaking it in water.

A wide range of mollusks including oysters , mussels and scallops were eaten by coastal and river-dwelling populations, and freshwater crayfish were seen as a desirable alternative to meat during fish days.

Compared to meat, fish was much more expensive for inland populations, especially in Central Europe, and therefore not an option for most. Freshwater fish such as pike , carp , bream , perch , lamprey and trout were common. While in modern times, water is often drunk with a meal, in the Middle Ages, however, concerns over purity, medical recommendations and its low prestige value made it less favored, and alcoholic beverages were preferred. They were seen as more nutritious and beneficial to digestion than water, with the invaluable bonus of being less prone to putrefaction due to the alcohol content.

Wine was consumed on a daily basis in most of France and all over the Western Mediterranean wherever grapes were cultivated. Further north it remained the preferred drink of the bourgeoisie and the nobility who could afford it, and far less common among peasants and workers. The drink of commoners in the northern parts of the continent was primarily beer or ale. Juices , as well as wines, of a multitude of fruits and berries had been known at least since Roman antiquity and were still consumed in the Middle Ages: Medieval drinks that have survived to this day include prunellé from wild plums modern-day slivovitz , mulberry gin and blackberry wine.

Many variants of mead have been found in medieval recipes, with or without alcoholic content. However, the honey -based drink became less common as a table beverage towards the end of the period and was eventually relegated to medicinal use. This is partially true since mead bore great symbolic value at important occasions. When agreeing on treaties and other important affairs of state, mead was often presented as a ceremonial gift. It was also common at weddings and baptismal parties, though in limited quantity due to its high price.

In medieval Poland , mead had a status equivalent to that of imported luxuries, such as spices and wines. Plain milk was not consumed by adults except the poor or sick, being reserved for the very young or elderly, and then usually as buttermilk or whey. Fresh milk was overall less common than other dairy products because of the lack of technology to keep it from spoiling.

However, neither of these non-alcoholic social drinks were consumed in Europe before the late 16th and early 17th century. Wine was commonly drunk and was also regarded as the most prestigious and healthy choice.

According to Galen 's dietetics it was considered hot and dry but these qualities were moderated when wine was watered down. Unlike water or beer, which were considered cold and moist, consumption of wine in moderation especially red wine was, among other things, believed to aid digestion, generate good blood and brighten the mood.

The first pressing was made into the finest and most expensive wines which were reserved for the upper classes. The second and third pressings were subsequently of lower quality and alcohol content.

Common folk usually had to settle for a cheap white or rosé from a second or even third pressing, meaning that it could be consumed in quite generous amounts without leading to heavy intoxication.

For the poorest or the most pious , watered-down vinegar similar to Ancient Roman posca would often be the only available choice. The aging of high quality red wine required specialized knowledge as well as expensive storage and equipment, and resulted in an even more expensive end product.

Judging from the advice given in many medieval documents on how to salvage wine that bore signs of going bad, preservation must have been a widespread problem. Even if vinegar was a common ingredient, there was only so much of it that could be used.

In the 14th century cookbook Le Viandier there are several methods for salvaging spoiling wine; making sure that the wine barrels are always topped up or adding a mixture of dried and boiled white grape seeds with the ash of dried and burnt lees of white wine were both effective bactericides , even if the chemical processes were not understood at the time. Wine was believed to act as a kind of vaporizer and conduit of other foodstuffs to every part of the body, and the addition of fragrant and exotic spices would make it even more wholesome.

Spiced wines were usually made by mixing an ordinary red wine with an assortment of spices such as ginger , cardamom , pepper , grains of paradise , nutmeg , cloves and sugar. These would be contained in small bags which were either steeped in wine or had liquid poured over them to produce hypocras and claré.

By the 14th century, bagged spice mixes could be bought ready-made from spice merchants. While wine was the most common table beverage in much of Europe, this was not the case in the northern regions where grapes were not cultivated.

Those who could afford it drank imported wine, but even for nobility in these areas it was common to drink beer or ale , particularly towards the end of the Middle Ages. In England , the Low Countries , northern Germany , Poland and Scandinavia , beer was consumed on a daily basis by people of all social classes and age groups.

For most medieval Europeans, it was a humble brew compared with common southern drinks and cooking ingredients, such as wine, lemons and olive oil. Even comparatively exotic products like camel 's milk and gazelle meat generally received more positive attention in medical texts. Beer was just an acceptable alternative and was assigned various negative qualities. In , the Sienese physician Aldobrandino described beer in the following way:. But from whichever it is made, whether from oats, barley or wheat, it harms the head and the stomach, it causes bad breath and ruins the teeth , it fills the stomach with bad fumes, and as a result anyone who drinks it along with wine becomes drunk quickly; but it does have the property of facilitating urination and makes one's flesh white and smooth.

The intoxicating effect of beer was believed to last longer than that of wine, but it was also admitted that it did not create the "false thirst" associated with wine. Though less prominent than in the north, beer was consumed in northern France and the Italian mainland. Perhaps as a consequence of the Norman conquest and the travelling of nobles between France and England, one French variant described in the 14th century cookbook Le Menagier de Paris was called godale most likely a direct borrowing from the English "good ale" and was made from barley and spelt , but without hops.

In England there were also the variants poset ale , made from hot milk and cold ale, and brakot or braggot , a spiced ale prepared much like hypocras. That hops could be used for flavoring beer had been known at least since Carolingian times, but was adopted gradually due to difficulties in establishing the appropriate proportions.

Before the widespread use of hops, gruit , a mix of various herbs , had been used. Gruit had the same preserving properties as hops, though less reliable depending on what herbs were in it, and the end result was much more variable. Another flavoring method was to increase the alcohol content, but this was more expensive and lent the beer the undesired characteristic of being a quick and heavy intoxicant.

Hops may have been widely used in England in the tenth century; they were grown in Austria by and in Finland by , and possibly much earlier. Before hops became popular as an ingredient, it was difficult to preserve this beverage for any time, and so, it was mostly consumed fresh. Quantities of beer consumed by medieval residents of Europe, as recorded in contemporary literature, far exceed intakes in the modern world.

For example, sailors in 16th century England and Denmark received a ration of 1 imperial gallon 4. Polish peasants consumed up to 3 litres 0. In the Early Middle Ages beer was primarily brewed in monasteries , and on a smaller scale in individual households. By the High Middle Ages breweries in the fledgling medieval towns of northern Germany began to take over production. Though most of the breweries were small family businesses that employed at most eight to ten people, regular production allowed for investment in better equipment and increased experimentation with new recipes and brewing techniques.

These operations later spread to the Netherlands in the 14th century, then to Flanders and Brabant , and reached England by the 15th century. Hopped beer became very popular in the last decades of the Late Middle Ages. When perfected as an ingredient, hops could make beer keep for six months or more, and facilitated extensive exports. In turn, ale or beer was classified into "strong" and "small", the latter less intoxicating, regarded as a drink of temperate people, and suitable for consumption by children.

As late as , John Locke stated that the only drink he considered suitable for children of all ages was small beer, while criticizing the apparently common practice among Englishmen of the time to give their children wine and strong alcohol. By modern standards, the brewing process was relatively inefficient, but capable of producing quite strong alcohol when that was desired.

One recent attempt to recreate medieval English "strong ale" using recipes and techniques of the era albeit with the use of modern yeast strains yielded a strongly alcoholic brew with original gravity of 1. The ancient Greeks and Romans knew of the technique of distillation , but it was not practiced on a major scale in Europe until some time around the 12th century, when Arabic innovations in the field combined with water-cooled glass alembics were introduced.

Distillation was believed by medieval scholars to produce the essence of the liquid being purified, and the term aqua vitae "water of life" was used as a generic term for all kinds of distillates.

Alcoholic distillates were also occasionally used to create dazzling, fire-breathing entremets a type of entertainment dish after a course by soaking a piece of cotton in spirits. It would then be placed in the mouth of the stuffed, cooked and occasionally redressed animals, and lit just before presenting the creation. Aqua vitae in its alcoholic forms was highly praised by medieval physicians.

In Arnaldus of Villanova wrote that "[i]t prolongs good health, dissipates superfluous humours, reanimates the heart and maintains youth.

By the 13th century, Hausbrand literally "home-burnt" from gebrannter wein, brandwein ; "burnt [distilled] wine" was commonplace, marking the origin of brandy. Towards the end of the Late Middle Ages, the consumption of spirits became so ingrained even among the general population that restrictions on sales and production began to appear in the late 15th century. In the city of Nuremberg issued restrictions on the selling of aquavit on Sundays and official holidays. Spices were among the most luxurious products available in the Middle Ages, the most common being black pepper , cinnamon and the cheaper alternative cassia , cumin , nutmeg , ginger and cloves.

They all had to be imported from plantations in Asia and Africa , which made them extremely expensive, and gave them social cachet such that pepper for example was hoarded, traded and conspicuously donated in the manner of gold bullion. The value of these goods was the equivalent of a yearly supply of grain for 1. Sugar , unlike today, was considered to be a type of spice due to its high cost and humoral qualities.

Even when a dish was dominated by a single flavor it was usually combined with another to produce a compound taste, for example parsley and cloves or pepper and ginger.

Common herbs such as sage , mustard , and parsley were grown and used in cooking all over Europe, as were caraway , mint , dill and fennel. Many of these plants grew throughout all of Europe or were cultivated in gardens, and were a cheaper alternative to exotic spices. Mustard was particularly popular with meat products and was described by Hildegard of Bingen — as poor man's food.

While locally grown herbs were less prestigious than spices, they were still used in upper-class food, but were then usually less prominent or included merely as coloring. Anise was used to flavor fish and chicken dishes, and its seeds were served as sugar-coated comfits. Surviving medieval recipes frequently call for flavoring with a number of sour, tart liquids. Wine, verjuice the juice of unripe grapes or fruits vinegar and the juices of various fruits, especially those with tart flavors, were almost universal and a hallmark of late medieval cooking.

In combination with sweeteners and spices, it produced a distinctive "pungeant, fruity" flavor. Equally common, and used to complement the tanginess of these ingredients, were sweet almonds. They were used in a variety of ways: This last type of non-dairy milk product is probably the single most common ingredient in late medieval cooking and blended the aroma of spices and sour liquids with a mild taste and creamy texture. Salt was ubiquitous and indispensable in medieval cooking. Salting and drying was the most common form of food preservation and meant that fish and meat in particular were often heavily salted.

Many medieval recipes specifically warn against oversalting and there were recommendations for soaking certain products in water to get rid of excess salt. The richer the host, and the more prestigious the guest, the more elaborate would be the container in which it was served and the higher the quality and price of the salt.

Wealthy guests were seated " above the salt ", while others sat "below the salt", where salt cellars were made of pewter, precious metals or other fine materials, often intricately decorated. The rank of a diner also decided how finely ground and white the salt was. Salt for cooking, preservation or for use by common people was coarser; sea salt, or "bay salt", in particular, had more impurities, and was described in colors ranging from black to green.

Expensive salt, on the other hand, looked like the standard commercial salt common today. The term " dessert " comes from the Old French desservir , "to clear a table", literally "to un-serve", and originated during the Middle Ages. It would typically consist of dragées and mulled wine accompanied by aged cheese , and by the Late Middle Ages could also include fresh fruit covered in sugar, honey or syrup and boiled-down fruit pastes.

Sugar , from its first appearance in Europe, was viewed as much as a drug as a sweetener; its long-lived medieval reputation as an exotic luxury encouraged its appearance in elite contexts accompanying meats and other dishes that to modern taste are more naturally savoury.

There was a wide variety of fritters , crêpes with sugar, sweet custards and darioles , almond milk and eggs in a pastry shell that could also include fruit and sometimes even bone marrow or fish. Marzipan in many forms was well known in Italy and southern France by the s and is assumed to be of Arab origin.

The English chefs also had a penchant for using flower petals such as roses , violets , and elder flowers. An early form of quiche can be found in Forme of Cury , a 14th-century recipe collection, as a Torte de Bry with a cheese and egg yolk filling. The ever-present candied ginger, coriander , aniseed and other spices were referred to as épices de chambre "parlor spices" and were taken as digestibles at the end of a meal to "close" the stomach. Just like Montpellier , Sicily was once famous for its comfits , nougat candy torrone , or turrón in Spanish and almond clusters confetti.

From the south, the Arabs also brought the art of ice cream making that produced sorbet and several examples of sweet cakes and pastries; cassata alla Siciliana from Arabic qas'ah , the term for the terra cotta bowl with which it was shaped , made from marzipan, sponge cake and sweetened ricotta and cannoli alla Siciliana , originally cappelli di turchi "Turkish hats" , fried, chilled pastry tubes with a sweet cheese filling.

Research into medieval foodways was, until around , a much neglected field of study. Misconceptions and outright errors were common among historians, and are still present in as a part of the popular view of the Middle Ages as a backward, primitive and barbaric era. Medieval cookery was described as revolting due to the often unfamiliar combination of flavors, the perceived lack of vegetables and a liberal use of spices.

The preservation techniques available at the time, although crude by today's standards, were perfectly adequate. Students who miss the meeting may be ineligible for the internship in the following semester.

Extenuating circumstances must be documented and will be considered on a case-by-case basis by the internship coordinator. Students requesting an internship at a site that requires a criminal background check are responsible for having the background check completed and submitted to the internship site for approval.

Students are responsible for paying any fees associated with the completion of the background check. Students must have the background check completed and accepted by the internship site when the work plan for the internship is submitted. Students who wish to appeal the internship requirement due to prior work experience may do so by completing and submitting the appeal form, available from the academic advisor, with written documentation to a three-member review committee.

Prior work experience is defined as a minimum of one year of full-time work experience in the field of the respective degree. Written documentation submitted with the form includes: The appeal packet must be received by the department internship coordinator no later than October 7th, March 7th, or May 7th, for the Spring, Summer, or Fall semesters, respectively.

The committee will meet prior to the internship meeting to discuss the appeals and make a recommendation to the Department Chair. Students who are denied appeals must attend the internship meeting and complete the internship. Students seeking the B. The courses listed below satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:. Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:. Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:.

All candidates for the degree must complete the following degree requirements in addition to the Core Curriculum requirements. Students pursuing the B.

The Bachelor of Science B. The degree requirements consist of the University Core Curriculum, major core requirements, elective courses in areas of specializations, a foreign language, and an internship. The major core is multidisciplinary introducing students to the fundamental subjects and the essential knowledge necessary for working in any field related to public health. The elective courses allow students to concentrate in one of the areas of specialization.

The degree program prepares students for health care related careers in government, private, and nonprofit organizations. In addition, graduates of this program will be competent in pursuing graduate studies in a variety of academic fields, including public health, allied health, public policy, nutrition, business, and law. It can also provide students with a pathway to advanced studies in medicine or dentistry, if the students use the electives to fulfill the additional admission requirements for medical and dental schools.

The degree program is offered in two concentrations: The minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree, including Core Curriculum requirements, is Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level.

All Public Health majors are expected to complete an internship 6 semester credit hours, hours of time on site. The courses listed below satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements; however, if these courses are taken to satisfy both requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

All candidates for the B. This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing the requirements for their UTSA undergraduate Public Health degree with a concentration in Health Promotion and Behavioral Science. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other requirements of this catalog and meet with their academic advisor for individualized degree plans.

Progress within this guide depends upon such factors as course availability, individual student academic preparation, student time management, work obligations, and individual financial considerations.

Students may choose to take courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters. The student will graduate with a baccalaureate degree in health or public health while earning a certificate in public health from UTHealth Houston SPH. Additionally, they will have the opportunity to complete a Master of Public Health MPH degree program in one additional year instead of the customary two years.

Graduates will be expected to acquire the education, skill-set and experience needed to enter the professional work force in any of the varied fields of public health, or be well prepared to continue with their education through doctoral studies or in professional degrees such as medicine, dentistry and pharmacy.

Students in good standing in the Bachelor of Science in Health or the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of a 3. This coursework will simultaneously satisfy remaining undergraduate requirements, as well as the core courses for the Master of Public Health MPH degree.

After satisfying the undergraduate degree requirements students will then apply for and finish the graduate program. Students may apply for admission into one of the concentrations within the Kinesiology major if they wish to specialize in athletic training, exercise physiology, kinesiology and health science, or physical education.

Students may also pursue the major without a concentration. This also applies to students who are unable to complete one of the concentrations. Academic advising for students seeking the Kinesiology degree is available in the Life and Health Sciences Advising Center. Students who wish to pursue teacher certification will be advised in the Interdisciplinary Education Advising Center. The minimum number of semester credit hours for this degree, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is , of which at least 39 must be at the upper-division level.

Experiential learning is a valuable element for kinesiology professionals. The internship is a time-limited, supervised period of kinesiology activities carried out in a kinesiology-oriented organization.

An internship is optional for the students in the Kinesiology major with no concentration. Students must have the background check completed and accepted by the internship site when the work plan for the internship site when the work plan for the internship is submitted.

Students in the Kinesiology major are required to successfully complete all required KIN courses, and select elective courses based on their post-graduate goals. Students become eligible to apply for the Texas state licensure upon completion of this concentration.

Students must be accepted into the Athletic Training Apprenticeship Program to pursue this concentration. The apprenticeship program involves hours of clinical internship over a minimum of five semesters. All kinesiology degree core and support work must be completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

The goal of admission requirements for the Athletic Training concentration is to provide undergraduate students with a program of study with the highest possible standards. To achieve this goal, the admission policy is designed to identify those students most likely to succeed in athletic training. All applicants for admission to the Athletic Training concentration will be initially admitted to the Kinesiology program without a concentration. In order for a student to declare the Athletic Training concentration, a student must be admitted to the Athletic Training Apprenticeship Program, and meet the following academic criteria.

To declare an Athletic Training concentration, a Kinesiology major must have:. For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements above. Students in the Athletic Training concentration are required to successfully complete all required HTH and KIN courses, and select designated elective courses based on their post-graduate goals.

Students are trained for careers in exercise science. To achieve this goal, the admission policy is designed to identify those students most likely to succeed in kinesiology education. Academic performance for declaration of the Exercise Physiology concentration will be evaluated after the following criteria has been met:.

Kinesiology majors with Exercise Physiology concentration are eligible to apply for an internship if they:. Prior work experience is defined as an experience that is at least equivalent to what students will earn in a hour internship. Both the length and quality of the experience will be evaluated. This concentration is suited for students who are taking prerequisite courses for medical schools or graduate programs in health professions e. Students who are interested in applying to these programs are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor and consult with the UTSA Health Professions Office.

The goal of admission requirements for the Kinesiology and Health Science concentration is to provide undergraduate students with a program of study with the highest possible standards. All applicants for admission to the Kinesiology and Health Science concentration will be initially admitted to the Kinesiology program without a concentration. In order for a student to declare the Kinesiology and Health Science concentration must meet the following academic criteria.

To declare an Kinesiology and Health Science concentration, a Kinesiology major must have:. An internship is optional for the students in the Kinesiology major with a concentration in Kinesiology and Health Science. Students in the Kinesiology and Health Science concentration are required to successfully complete all required KIN courses, and select designated elective courses based on their post-graduate goals.

Students are prepared for careers in teaching physical education pre-kindergarten—grade Academic advising for students seeking the Kinesiology degree is available in the Interdisciplinary Education Advising Center. These courses require an advisor code and are restricted to students who have applied and been accepted into the Teacher Certification Program. All the courses listed for the Physical Education Concentration 84 hours are required for teacher certification in physical education.

Only the courses marked with an asterisk are restricted and require an advisor code and acceptance into the Teacher Certification Program. Advisor codes for these classes will be issued only if all prerequisites have been completed. Didactic and introductory supervised experiences are part of the curriculum and serve as a foundation for the Master of Dietetics Studies MDS. Students must meet all admission requirements to seek the dual B.

Successful completion of both degrees certifies the student as eligible to take the national exam to become a Registered Dietitian RD. Students admitted into the undergraduate program are not guaranteed placement into the MDS unless they maintain a 3.

Students on the B. Some of the requirements are known to be a good predictor of achievement in the graduate professional phase of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. Admission into the major as part of a cohort group occurs in the Fall Semester. In order to declare a major in Nutrition and Dietetics, a student must meet the following criteria:.

Transfer students must meet all the above criteria and meet all the UTSA undergraduate admission requirements. Official transcripts from all institutions attended must be submitted.

A criminal background check is required during the semesters in which a student enrolls in field-based practicums.

Students will be required to complete a Criminal Record Check for practicums associated with schools, healthcare facilities, hospitals and clinics. It is the responsibility of the student to determine if his or her criminal history background will present a problem before applying for admission to the program. Students with problematic criminal history will not be able to complete most of the field experiences that are required by the program.

This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing their UTSA undergraduate degree requirements that are part of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other admission requirements for the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; and meet with their advisor for individualized degree plans.

Students may choose to take core and support courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters. Courses in the Nutrition and Dietetics Program are only offered once a year, according to the guide below. The practicum courses involve traveling off campus to affiliation sites. Check the University Schedule of Classes or with the instructor to plan the rest of the course schedule accordingly.

All students pursuing the Minor in Community Health must complete the following 18 semester credit hours:. All students pursuing the Minor in Wellness must complete the following 18 semester credit hours:. To declare a Minor in Community Health or Wellness or to obtain advice, students should consult their academic advisor. All students pursuing a Certificate in Athletic Coaching must complete the following 15 semester credit hours:. This course is designed to provide teacher certification students with the opportunity to gain developmentally appropriate knowledge and skills in health and environmental safety.

It will address health-related issues in personal, interpersonal, and community settings and creating a safe teaching environment. Offered Spring Semester only. Introduction to Community and Public Health. This course is a survey of the profession of public health and the competencies required of health educators, including examination of philosophies, ethics and current trends.

This course serves as a foundation for other courses in the health degree. Emphasizes the concept of mind, body, and spirit as necessary components of total well-being; principles of preventive health; and self-responsibility for personal health behaviors.

This course introduces students to practices and skills that are commonly used in community health and preventive health services. These include health screening skills and skills for communicating and interpreting screening results. The course offers hands-on practice of these skills. Database Management in Community and Public Health. This course will focus on practical issues in database management. Students will learn how to perform basic query and reporting operations, migrate data between various file formats, share data using cloud data management systems such as Dropbox, prepare data for statistical analysis, conduct statistical analyses common in community and public health, perform data quality control and assurance procedures and develop formal documents for reporting outcomes.

Survey of Drugs and Health. Study of the use and abuse of drugs and other substances. Examines addiction, dependence, tolerance, motivation for use, and effects of substance abuse on health and society.

Survey of Human Nutrition. An overview approach to understanding the principles of nutrition and their effect on health and fitness. Emphasis on major nutritional issues throughout the human life cycle; self-evaluation of diet and fitness habits. Survey of Human Sexuality. A study examining the breadth of human sexuality, including psychosocial, cultural and physical aspects, and its impact on our lives. Principles of Weight Management.

An in-depth study of the field of prevention and management of obesity. This course provides practical application of nutritional, psychological, and physical activity principles that help individuals manage their own weight and is suitable for students in health, kinesiology, psychology, biology, counseling, or others.

A noncompetitive, monitored activity component is required. Physical Activity and Health. The course provides a survey of the health-related effects and social-cultural and behavioral determinants of physical activity and exercise.

Theories of Health Behavior. Designed to provide an overview of health behavior theories, program planning models and multi-level interventions typically used in public health. Each level of the socio-ecological model will be discussed including individual, interpersonal, organization, community and policy.

Directed field experience is required. Formerly titled "Foundations of Health Theory. Study of community health problems and the function and organization of public, private, and voluntary health agencies, application of health theories and models and program planning methods. Offered Fall Semester only. Organization, administration, and supervision of health programs in the community, school, business, or industry setting. Application of health theories, models and program planning methods is required.

Application of theories and models for program development, implementation and evaluation. Health majors and minors only. Physical, social, and psychological development throughout the lifespan.

Implications for health professionals at all stages of development prenatal to death are addressed. Practical application of techniques for shaping healthier emotional behavior; emphasis on personality, stress management, and fulfilling relationships. Child and Adolescent Health Promotion. Designed for students who are interested in promoting the health of youth, as well as those students pursuing academic training in education and community health.

The primary goal of this course is to improve the health literacy of teachers and health promotion specialists through understanding and application of evidence-based child and adolescent health promotion concepts. Program Planning and Evaluation. This course provides students with a basic understanding of planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs in a variety of settings, including worksite, healthcare, and community and at a various levels individual, organization, community, policy.

Human Disease and Epidemiology. An in-depth look at the etiology, prevention, and treatment of chronic and contagious diseases afflicting humans and epidemiological methods.

An in-depth study of human sexuality, including psychosocial, cultural and physical aspects. An in-depth examination of the principles of nutrition and their effects on health and fitness. Emphasis on critical thinking and translation of nutritional knowledge to real-world settings. Includes self-evaluation of diet and fitness habits. Application of health theories and models for program development, implementation, and evaluation in nutritional context.

Environmental Health and Safety. Choose this more extreme plan only if quick weight loss is your priority. Within hours of posting a seven-second video of their son learning to walk, Whitney and Adam Dinkel were flooded with messages. The small town of Wenatchee, Washington, is at the center of a virtual gold rush — whether residents like it or not. Share Tweet Reddit Flipboard Email. Cost per pound of weight loss: It's economical and has a proven track record. In the Zone Delivery Cost: No, unless you're looking for white-glove service.

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